gupta
  • 133 Bevill/2101B Shelby Hall
  • (205) 348-3822
Arunava Gupta
Professor / MINT Professor & Distinguished University Research Professor
Education: Master's Degree

M.Sc.,1976, Indian Institute of Technology; M.A., 1977, Columbia University

Education: Doctoral Degree

Ph.D., 1980, Stanford University

Research Interests

Investigation of nanostructured materials, with emphasis on the controlled fabrication and synthesis of novel structures, manipulating and probing their surface and interface properties, and exploring potential applications. Implementation of a multidisciplinary approach, interfacing chemistry, materials science, physics and biology.

Materials for information technology, in particular spintronics (spin-based electronics). Traditional semi-conductor devices rely on the transport and storage of electronic charge. Spintronics exploits electron spin, creating a new class of devices that can potentially be scaled down to nano-dimensions and can also provide additional functionality. Research goals include: 1) thin film growth utilizing a variety of deposition techniques, including chemical vapor deposition, pulsed laser deposition and sputtering; 2) utilization of a combinatorial approach for depositing and characterizing these films where possible to enable rapid screening of a wide variety of materials; 3) synthesis and characteriza-tion of novel magnetic thin films and heterostructures, in particular oxides, with atomic layer control of the interfaces; 4) fabrication of devices, such as magnetic tunnel junctions and spin-based semiconductors, using these materials for storage, memory and logic functions.

Nanostructured materials for biomedical applications, with emphasis on magnetic oxides. Magnetic nanoparticles represent an extremely interesting group of inorganic materials having a close connection to living systems. They offer exciting possibilities for use in the detection, manipulation and functional control of biomolecules and cells, with potential medical applications in areas such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic fluid hyperthermia and contrast imaging. Research goals emphasize the development of: 1) novel synthetic strategies for the production of various shape nanostructures, including particles, wires, tubes or ribbons; 2) subsequent modification of their surface with coatings to render them biocompatible and enable selective surface immobilization of bioactive molecules.

Representative Publications

K. Ramasamy, X. Zhang, R. D. Bennett, and A. Gupta, “Synthesis, Photoconductivity and Self-Assembly of Wurtzite Phase Cu2CdxZn1-xSnS4 Nanorods”, RSC Advances 3, 1186 (2013).

M. N. Iliev, P. Silwal, B. Loukya, R. Datta, D. H. Kim, N. D. Todorov, N. Pachauri, and A. Gupta “Raman Studies of Cation Distribution and Thermal Stability of Epitaxial Spinel NiCo2O4 Films”, J. Appl. Phys. 114, 033514 (2013).

A. Kale, Y. Bao,Z. Zhou,P. E. Prevelige,and A. Gupta, “Directed Self-assembly of CdS Quantum Dots on Bacteriophage P22 Coat Protein Templates”, Nanotechnology 24, 045603 (2013).

G. Kim,D. Mazumdar, and A. Gupta, “Nanoscale Electroresistance Properties of All-Oxide Magneto-Electric Tunnel Junction with Ultra-Thin Barium Titanate Barrier”, Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 052908 (2013).

N. Li, S. Schäfer, R. Datta, T. Mewes, T. M. Klein, and A. Gupta, “Microstructural and Ferromagnetic Resonance Properties of Epitaxial Nickel Ferrite Films Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition”, Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 132409 (2012).

X. Zhong, P. LeClair, S. Sorkar, and A. Gupta, “Metal-Insulator Transition in Epitaxial VO2 Thin Films on TiO2 (100)”, Phys. Rev. B 86, 094114 (2012).

R. F. Klie, Q. Qiao, T. Paulauskas, A. Gulec, A. Rebola, S. Öğüt, M.P. Prange, J.C. Idrobo, and S.T. Pantelides, S. Kolesnik and B. Dabrowski, M. Özdemir, C. Boyraz, D. Mazumdar, and A. Gupta, “The Effects of Increased Co-ion Spin States on the Seebeck Coefficient in Thermoelectric Ca3Co4O9”, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 196601 (2012).

X. Zhang, N. Z. Bao, K. Ramasamy, Y-H. A. Wang, Y. Wang, B. Lin, and A. Gupta, “Crystal Phase-Controlled Synthesis of Cu2FeSnS4 Nanocrystals with Band Gap around 1.5 eV”, Chem. Commun. 48, 4956 (2012).

K. Ramasamy, D. Mazumdar, Z. Zhou, Y-H. A. Wang, and A. Gupta, “Colloidal Synthesis of Magnetic CuCr2S4 Nanocrystals and Nanoclusters”, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 20716 (2011).

Y-H. A. Wang, X. Zhang, N. Z. Bao, B. Lin, and A. Gupta, “Synthesis of Shape-Controlled Monodisperse Wurtzite CuInxGa1-xS2 Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Tunable Band Gap”, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 11072 (2011).